Tag: interview

Audio exclusive: Baby Lung ‘Casualty’

Baby Lung are a fresh new Northampton quartet, mixing minimalist emotional indie with a hint of jazzy vibes. Their debut single from back in November, ‘She’, laid out the agenda:…

Baby Lung are a fresh new Northampton quartet, mixing minimalist emotional indie with a hint of jazzy vibes. Their debut single from back in November, ‘She’, laid out the agenda: an atmospheric ’80s sound [like your man Ryan Adams might do], with a steady hypnotic rhythm backing dreamy guitars and synths to create a sum greater than its parts. New Boots spoke to singer/bassist Maxx Riley about these early days of the band, and we can exclusively reveal the audio to follow-up single, the harder-hitting ‘Casualty’, below.

How  did you guys get together?
Back in November 2017 I was pretty much done with music. My previous band [We Animals] was playing a few good shows and putting out some good music, but we couldn’t get to that next level. I had just come out of a relationship so I wasn’t focused on making music and at the time I was also working in the music industry, so music had become a chore more than a passion. Me and Mat [Day], who plays lead guitar in Baby Lung, were setting up some acoustic guitars for work, and I remember watching him play these jazz chords that I hadn’t heard before – I was very much ‘the same four chords with a capo on’ type of songwriter. I asked him to teach me a few chords and I managed to write a song with them. One song became a couple and then a few and so on. I managed to get the buzz of writing back and I straight away knew that Mat had to play guitar in the band. I had worked with Harry [Dinnage], who plays drums for Baby Lung, in my previous band so I was aware of how talented he was. I asked if he wanted to come and jam with us and we instantly clicked and had three songs complete in our first practise. For the next year we decided that we weren’t going to rush into gigging and instead we spent six months being unknown, with no social medias, just perfecting the songs and finding our sound. After recording our first two singles we were introduced to Matt [Willett], our saxophonist/rhythm guitarist, who has added so much to our songs already. It has only been a couple months with Matt but instantly we’re all on the same page with writing, and we’re all equally as committed to pushing ourselves and making music that we want to hear.

Who are the main influences that make up this project, do you think?
We all bring something completely different to the table, so I think this would need to be answered individually. For me personally it was Paul Weller, Jamie T, Mike Skinner (as well as others) that turned me from a drummer to a songwriter. I learnt that you could have fun with the lyrics whilst also keeping them relatable for everyone. I was very late in discovering the greats of music, and only in the last two years I’ve discovered geniuses such as Nat King Cole, Vera Lynn, Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Sammy Davis Jnr., as well as many others which has really opened my eyes to a new way of writing. Luckily we’re all quite open minded people so we could be listening to Charlie Parker one day and then The Beatles the next. There’s currently a rise of current artists putting their twists on genres such as Yellow Days, Puma Blue, King Krule etc. I think they’ve influenced us to write what we want to write and to not be afraid to flirt between genres. I think as a band we unintentionally take different musical characteristics from different genres, such as the change of dynamics used in grunge to the catchy choruses used in indie or the real bluesy guitar solos mixed with jazz chords etc. We see no point in restricting ourselves and at the same time manage to keep ‘our sound’.

What was the reaction like to your first release, ‘She’?
I was real nervous about releasing ‘She’, and we actually waited around five months to release the single. We were unknown, so it was important to us to have a good single to release accompanied with an equally as good music video, which our close friend Ryan Johnson shot for us, in order to get people’s attention – which I believe we have done. Off the back of this we’ve received compliments from friends, family, members of the public, some high up people in the music industry and we’ve received numerous gig offers which we’re thrilled with. I think ‘She’ was the first song we ever worked on as a band, so I’m happy it’s gone down so well.

Tell us about this new song, ‘Casualty’.
The one piece of criticism we’ve received from a review was that ‘She’ was basic in terms of song structure, i.e verse chorus verse chorus etc. Although it was intentionally written like that I can’t wait for people to check out ‘Casualty’. Structurally this song is miles apart from ‘She’, and really shows our songwriting skills. I don’t like to go into too much details about what the song means as I hope they are subjective to whoever is listening. However the main premise is falling in love, and having that fear that at any minute it could end.

What was the last album you bought/streamed?
Maxx – Julie Is Her Name by Julie London
Mat – Carolina Confessions by Marcus King
Harry – Con Todo El Mundo by Khruangbin
Matt – Skylight by Pinegrove

What is your burning desire for the band to do in the future? What plans do you have?
Our burning desire is the same as any other band; play big shows, record albums, etc. At the minute we’re happy with staying low and writing more and continuing to be perfectionists. We’re heading into the studio in early 2019 to record an EP, with a number of music videos to follow. We’re at the stage now where we can start to look for gigs and we plan to gig all across the UK.

Casualty hits the streaming/download services on January 4th

 

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New Music Friday: Brazen Foxes

Brand new outfit Brazen Foxes have spent 2018 honing their craft, and finish it with their first single, ‘Fool’. The indie-rock trio will be ones to watch in 2019, but…

Brand new outfit Brazen Foxes have spent 2018 honing their craft, and finish it with their first single, ‘Fool’. The indie-rock trio will be ones to watch in 2019, but for now let Benson Fox tell you all about their development.

How did you guys get together?
“This project is an ambition we’ve shared since we were quite young. We met and started jamming together at Foxhill Music School in our mid-teens. To some extent or another we all have a connection with that place. We used to help out with the annual music festivals they put on, work with some of the younger students, and older for that matter. It was a really nice place to grow up as musicians, and we all learned a hell of a lot during that time. After that the three of us went our separate ways musically for a while. We’ve played in various bands, had lives, got jobs; the usual stuff. Then in November last year Ben seemed to have some kind of divine moment of clarity, messaged both Sam and I, said “Right, we’re doing this” and that was that. We’ve been writing and working together ever since.

How would you describe your sound?
We set out to write songs with anthemic catchy choruses but with a technical, almost post-hardcore edge to them.  We wouldn’t go so far as to put a stick in the ground and say “this is us”, however. There’s so much music and influence out there at the moment. It’s so easy to just put stuff out and see what happens. Three words that spring to mind to describe our current sound: soulful, hard-hitting and melodic.

Who are your main influences do you think?
We took some inspiration from bands like At The Drive In, Cursive and Biffy Clyro but we’re also huge fans of some of the great songwriters and producers of the last 50 years. Quincy Jones, Nile Rodgers and David Bowie just to name a few, so there’s also a really big funk, soul and Motown influence. Then artists like Twenty One Pilots, Public Service Broadcasting and Bruno Major are doing some really interesting things at the moment as well. There’s so much music, so much inspiration out there at the moment it’s impossible to cover all of it.

Tell us about this new release, ‘Fool’.
‘Fool’ is the first song we wrote together as a band, and has almost set the trend for the songs we’ve written since then. For us though this song is just the tip of the iceberg. ‘Fool’ is about misguided love and the feeling you get when your delusions begin to unravel. We’ve all been there: you meet someone, you get to know them for a while, they lead you on and then throw you away like nothing happened. ‘Fool’ is about going through this transitional period between fantasy and reality. The loss, confusion and pain you feel but also the liberation once you come out the other side and realise what a fool you’ve been.

What are your live shows like?
Here’s a review by Jacob Barnaby of the second Brazen Foxes second gig at The Pomfret Arms [November 3rd]
“Modern music often falls into two categories: overly-simple-repetitive-commercial tracks lacking innovation; or music so complex that you need a degree to understand the time-signatures and harmonies. Brazen Foxes found the sweet spot in the middle of that Venn Diagram. In the last few months, I have not heard music so diverse and complex yet so easy to enjoy. The three Foxes bring a stellar repertoire of experience from playing professionally to running jam nights in towns. Through spending so much time immersed in different types of music and the need to please crowds they have developed a unique but familiar tone. One that instantly resonates with your old, rusty memories of certain tracks, but still surprises you by coating those sounds with a new coat of paint”.

Are you part of a wider scene in Northamptonshire?
We’re just starting out at the moment so no, we’re not particularly well established amongst any local scene. We’re really only just working towards that now. With the release of our first single this month and our emergence on the scene we’ve had a really strong end to our first year as a band. We’re looking forward to our fourth gig coming up at Club 43 in Northampton on the 15th of December – and even more so what next year has to offer.

What was the last album you bought/streamed?
Sam Thorne: Outlandos D’Amour – The Police
Benson Fox: Mekong Delta Sunrise – Astronomy Class
Ben Hood: A Song For Every Moon – Bruno Major

What is your burning desire for the band to do in the future?
The biggest one for all of us is to be able to earn a living: writing, recording and playing music. We’ve all got jobs, we’re all financing this project at the moment so the first goal is to get the project paying for itself. After that who knows. Hopefully play some big festivals, make the music we love making and most importantly; have fun!

What plans do you have?
We really want to branch out with our sounds and influences. In the new year we’re taking on a studio space where we can set up all our gear permanently. Hopefully this will enable us to start making decent quality recordings in our own space, rather than spending thousands in the studio. This should give us the freedom to create and release music that appeals to a variety of audiences. We believe the joy of writing music in the 21st century is you don’t have to conform to a genre, sound or set of influences. To quote the old adage, “The whole world is watching”. Throw enough paint at the wall and something might stick.

‘Fool’ is available to stream and buy on all the usual platforms

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New Music Friday: The Sunchymes

The Sunchymes is the psychedelic/power-pop project of Northamptonshire artist Aaron. Three albums over seven years have been met with much critical acclaim, and he’s back with a brand new single…

The Sunchymes is the psychedelic/power-pop project of Northamptonshire artist Aaron. Three albums over seven years have been met with much critical acclaim, and he’s back with a brand new single ‘Masquerade’. Time for a New Boots chat, then.

How did you get this project together?
I started in 2007 after a band I was in split up. I had lots of songs written and I wanted to record some albums and release them.

How/where do you record?
Mainly in my home studio.

How would you describe your sound? You had a very particular mission statement when you set out to “distill the songwriting and musical values espoused by The Beach Boys on ‘Pet Sounds’ and The Beatles on ‘Sgt Pepper'”.
My main influences are definitely The Beatles, The Beach Boys and The Byrds. I think there are influences from all these bands in my music, but with my take on those sounds.

There’s been three albums since 2009. The reaction to them has been fantastic, that must spur you on…
Yeah, it was a pleasant surprise that there are people out there that like my music. It does spur me on, but I love writing songs in any case.

You’ve dropped your toe back in the water this year with ‘Try’ and now ‘Masquerade’. Do you like this approach to putting music out, i.e. whenever you feel like it?
I do and it’s great that anyone can do this in the modern age with the likes of Bandcamp and CDBaby, etc.

What is ‘Masquerade’ about, may we ask?
It’s basically about a toxic relationship where the bad person pretends they have changed but ultimately it’s found they have not and the person is unmasked.

You began a side project last year, an indie-psych trio called The Paperweight Array. Can you tell us briefly about that, and how you approach it as a separate thing from The Sunchymes?
Yeah, I have really enjoyed doing that. I wanted to do something with a slightly darker edge, so I called up some old friends. Luckily they were up for doing the project. The Sunchymes has probably taken a back seat over the last couple of years as a result of it though.

Being a solo artist it must be tough to bring the full sonic vision to the stage?
Yeah definitely. I do solo acoustic gigs, so the songs are really stripped back. However some of them work really nicely, and it’s good to get out and play them to new audiences and meet people on the scene.

What has been your favourite Sunchymes moment to date?
That’s a difficult one. On one hand I would say recording the second album was the best time [2012’s Let Your Free Flag Fly]. On the other hand playing at the International Pop Overthrow Festival at The Cavern Club [2014] was great too.

What was the last “new” album you bought/streamed?
Cabin Life by Linus of Hollywood

What is your burning desire to do in the future? What plans do you have for 2019?
To keep writing songs, and hopefully do another album, as well as playing a few gigs.

 

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New Music Friday: L30 Robinson

L30 Robinson is a young Northampton-based tongue-in-cheek rapper who began releasing music in 2014, regularly collaborating with long-term friend and DJ Charlie Borthwick [aka CB]. In 2017 he released his first…

L30 Robinson is a young Northampton-based tongue-in-cheek rapper who began releasing music in 2014, regularly collaborating with long-term friend and DJ Charlie Borthwick [aka CB]. In 2017 he released his first studio album Wish U Were Here. He’s just dropped another of his masterful efforts, ‘3’7 – Size Don’t Matter’. New Boots chose the occasion to have a few words.

When did you start rapping, and when did you first take it out of your bedroom into the world?
Attending Weston Favell and having supply teachers was a regular occurrence, and one of the supplies used to play songs in his classes to get the kids on board and make him seem cool. I always tried to freestyle over the instrumental sections of the songs. Then when Charlie moved to my school in about 2011 he heard me in one of those lessons and said “yo I’ve just started making beats you should make a song with one” so I did and it all began there. I used his beat for a YouTube video shot in my bedroom then started making and uploading like 2-3 vids a week.

What were those crucial early influences that made you think, “this is for me”?
As a beginner I always struggled with flow, but I compared myself to rappers my level and I didn’t sound like any of them lyrically. I was always more mature with my lyrics and then people who watched me generally had the same feeling. I remember after a year or so I was shooting a freestyle for a media channel called SoSoBlessed and the cameraman Tera D said “Leo your flow needs work but your lyrics are crazy” and that’s really stuck with me to this day.

How would you describe your sound?
Straight to the point, lyrical storytelling.

What was the reaction like to last year’s Wish U Were Here album?
The feedback was really positive, but I think I came across way too dense. There’s one feature in the first song so it’s all me and it’s got like 18 tracks. I would’ve been better off staggering it into four EPs or something, but you live and you learn and it just means I’ve got 20 sick songs on Spotify.

Tell us everything about this new song, “3’7 – Size Don’t Matter”.
The song follows no direct story, it’s just one liners. The beat was made by Bak Beats [check him out on YouTube] and when I heard it I was just drawn into being aggressive with the lyrics but in a playful way as to not come across too harsh. For instance “Mistaken identity/Are you p*****?/That guy’s white and 6’6” is actually a true story about how Charlie got beat up in a nightclub in Kettering and the bouncers walked straight past the guy who did it, threw me out, then the police arrested me – only to release me later on. Chaos.

How do you approach your live performances? Faithful recreations your thing, or do you improvise?
We rehearse our sets. I always change the song order and try to add something different to each show. At NMF 2016 me and Charlie finished our set with a screeching flat line sound playing and walked down the road for a beer leaving everyone confused about what was going on.

Do you feel part of a wider scene in Northampton? Any favourite acts or venues?
I feel more connected with the local bands that any rap scene, although Lay it down is changing that. Shout out to Leon Denton he’s working hard to form a rap scene. I don’t wanna start naming acts then forget someone but I’ll give you this: when me and Charlie won Northampton’s Best Young Musical act in 2016 at the Roadmender that was special, not just to win it but I’m the only rapper to ever win it. As a rapper I was already at a disadvantage because people would put me in a box and say “it’s not hard”, as I wasn’t playing an instrument, yet some of the bands they were supporting played a couple covers standing still with no stage presence whatsoever – not exactly difficult.

You were recently on ITV2 show ‘Don’t Hate The Playaz’. Tell us about that.
That was hooked up by Leon from Lay It Down. He was contacted by ITV and he passed on some details to me. They liked my material and it all went from there. It’s an amazing thing to see of course, but normal people are on TV everyday. I’m just glad I took my opportunity, but I’m hungry for more.

What was the last album you bought/streamed?
Jay Rock – Redemption. Awesome album, literally complete. It’s got hits, deep songs; it makes you want him to win. Jay Rock is so underrated.

What is your burning desire to do in the future? What plans do you have for 2019?
I need to perform more out of town. I’m thinking if I can bag like two shows a month then I’ll be happy with that. The music I’ve got stored will take care of me online, so I now want to make a more physical reach out.

 

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New Music Friday: Mio Flux

Mio Flux (aka Jacob Bartoli) is a Northampton electronic producer, who is working alongside Patchy, The Rockstar on many of his collaborations. ‘SNL’ is the latest single to drop, and…

Mio Flux (aka Jacob Bartoli) is a Northampton electronic producer, who is working alongside Patchy, The Rockstar on many of his collaborations. ‘SNL’ is the latest single to drop, and it’s such a great tune [and Northampton love-in] that New Boots had to have a few moments with him.

How/why did you start the Mio Flux project?
I started the Mio Flux project when I was about 17. Before then I was a frontman for indie bands and indie solo projects. My laptop and software changed everything for me musically, I started to appreciate the electronic side of music and ended up totally indulged and obsessed with it. The reasoning behind Mio Flux was to be able to collaborate with as many artists as possible from all genres and mix my two musical loves together. I always wanted to do something different and original.

How would you describe your sound?
Atmospheric. I like to add multiple layers and create my own sounds that are unexpected. I think the intro for ‘Catch My Hook’ describes my sound the best; catchy melodies with bells and airy synths as an under layer. Hopefully interesting for the listener.

Who are your main influences in music? It seems to be everything from Diplo to David Bowie…
I have a wide range. I am very influenced by producers like Murda Beatz, Mike Will Made it, Diplo, Pharrel, Mark Ronson and George Martin. They are all game changing producers in their own right. However one of my strongest influences is definitely Scritti Politti from the 70/80’s. In my eyes they have a perfect combination of outstanding songwriting, production, catchy guitar/synth/bass riffs, and memorable choruses.

What was it about Patchy that attracted you to working with him?
We met working at Toys’R’Us, and he was my manager. He first did a verse on a track I was cooking up with Marcus and George from Sarpa Salpa, and from then we just clicked and began working on ‘Balmain’, and others. Our collaboration has been going on for well over a year now, and I feel we get stronger and better with every track. His hooks are unreal; every single one of them is as catchy as the last.

What was the reaction like to [previous single] ‘Sabo’?
Fantastic, every show without fail people know the chorus [it’s not too complex], so it seems to be a really uplifting song in our set that injects energy into the crowd. It’s a song I always compare our new tracks too, to see if they have the same energy on stage.

Tell us about this new release, ‘SNL’.
The single started by Patchy and I wanting to sample guitars and really demonstrate there’s more to rap than just the beats and repetitive melodies. So we went through a few bands we know in Northampton and ‘She Never Lies’ by Sarpa Salpa stood out. SNL consists of Sarpa’s guitar recordings over the top of a trap beat. Even Marcus’ vocals make an appearance at the end of the streaming versions of the song. We wanted to really break through new ground and collaborate with an interesting mix of genres. The video is also directed by ourselves, and edited by our regular collaborator in the States, Lil Adlib. The video carries on our theme of retro gaming. There are even scenes of me and Patchy fighting in Street Fighter 2.

What are your live shows like?
Energetic and fast paced. We like to keep a continuous flow of music so Patchy and I will talk in intros or filtered outs. This ensures the crowd are kept on their toes. It’s made for every music lover.

What has been your favourite Mio Flux moment of 2018?
Without a doubt it was mine and Patchy’s headline show at the Garibaldi. The atmosphere was unreal, everyone chanting our lyrics, I won’t forget that night for a long time. The line up was so strong too; Leo Robinson, Charlie Borthwick and Kiao opening the show and Ginger Snaps providing the after party. I can’t thank everyone enough for that night, a night I really wasn’t expecting.

What was the last thing you bought/streamed?
Anderson .Paak ‘Tints’ [featuring Kendrick Lemar]. The single has got me really excited for his new album to drop. He’s definitely someone I would love to work with.

What is your burning desire to do in the future? What plans do you have?
Patchy and I are building up enough quality music to be able to release a joint mixtape, and hopefully go on tour with it. I want to keep our momentum flowing with singles and videos beforehand. Also I have nearly finished a collaboration with The Barratts: if you love ‘The Garrison’, I hope you love the remix too.

SNL is out now on the usual digital platforms

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New Music Friday: Ginger Snaps

Northampton pop artiste Ginger Snaps – aka Jay Brook and friends – has been regularly treating us to his three minute ditties since 2016. The latest served up from the…

Northampton pop artiste Ginger Snaps – aka Jay Brook and friends – has been regularly treating us to his three minute ditties since 2016. The latest served up from the former OhBoy!, My Pilot and Bruises man is ‘With Or Without Her’. New Boots ventured into the heart of ShoeTown to meet up with Brook in his natural domain – the studio – and go over the project with a fine tooth comb. Listen in below

 

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Interview: Charlotte Carpenter brings us Babywoman Records

Kettering singer-songwriter Charlotte Carpenter has earlier in the summer launched her own record label, Babywoman Records, and today  announces the first release on it from Alessi’s Ark. New Boots Editor Phil…

Kettering singer-songwriter Charlotte Carpenter has earlier in the summer launched her own record label, Babywoman Records, and today  announces the first release on it from Alessi’s Ark. New Boots Editor Phil Istine met up for a coffee and spoke to Carpenter all about it, in our first ever audio interview just below. Full single release details are below too.

The Alessi’s Ark single is entitled ‘Devant Moi’, and is released digitally on September 27th. A fresh dreamy, French pop sound comes from Londoner Alessi Laurent-Marke, and is a follow up to her fourth studio LP Love Is The Currency [2017]. Delivered in French (a mother tongue for Alessi), she remarks of the song:
“’Devant Moi’ is the connection felt between true partners, taking that leap and being open to love with another being. I feel such a strong connection to water when swimming, the ground when walking, it’s so visceral, physical, intimate, medicinal… but only to a point. ‘Devant Moi’ is about being ready, at last, to share intimacy after a long period spent alone in connection with nature only”.

Alessi has toured extensively in the UK, Europe, US and Japan: with Mumford & Sons, Laura Marling, John Grant, Jenny Lewis and M.Ward amongst others. Her releases have won acclaim from BBC London, BBC 6, XFM, WFMU, DubLab, KEXP and previous LP ‘Love Is The Currency’ was warmly welcomed by MOJO, Guardian, Best Fit, Clash, and The 405. ‘Devant Moi’ is produced by fellow Ark member Jason Santos, and mixed by Jag Jago. 

Alessi heads out on a run of UK & EU shows with Carpenter this November:

Saturday 17th – The Playhouse, Northampton
Monday 19th – The Islington, London
Tuesday 20th – The Castle, Manchester
Wednesday 21st – Yellow Arch Studios, Sheffield
Thursday 22nd – Prince Albert, Stroud
Saturday 24th – De Log, Ghent
Sunday 25th – Kulturcafe Lichtung, Cologne
Tuesday 27th – Freundlich+Kompetent, Hamburg
Thursday 29th – Feinkost Lampe, Hannover

Babywoman Records on Facebook. Artwork design by Rogue Ink and CC/AA photo by Wild Sisters

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New Music Friday: Grace

Kettering quartet Grace have been making a name for themselves away from the spotlight these past two years, and now with the latest single ‘Lately’ it is time for New…

Kettering quartet Grace have been making a name for themselves away from the spotlight these past two years, and now with the latest single ‘Lately’ it is time for New Boots to have a word in their ear and discover what they’re all about.

How did you get together?
Back in 2014 our singer Jamie got tired of playing guitar in the mirror and decided to recruit three other guys to form a band. This new band consisted of James Virtue on bass, Nathan Robinson on drums and Josh Menon on second guitar (along with Jamie on vocals and lead guitar). Although we had aspirations to do bigger things we basically just got together every week on a Tuesday lunch in school and played ‘Voodoo Child’ until we’d pissed off enough people within 100 yards! From then on things pretty much stayed the same until we realised we couldn’t move forwards playing stale Presley songs and half assing a few Chilli numbers, so Jamie wrote a few songs and we put our heads to something new. Ever since 2016 we’ve been writing, playing and, when we have the funds, recording our own material. In short, we got together because we all thought, and still think, that we have something to offer musically that is worth listening to. We wanted to recreate that feeling you get when you first hear a new band that sparks something you forgot you could feel.

How would you describe your sound?
Our sound largely derives from a combination of minimalism, typically in the verses, and then more complex, powerful passages. Sort of like if you took Kurt Cobain’s approach to writing a pop song, then added the rhythm of the Chilli Peppers! Often we’ll write our songs with sections to highlight the drums, paired nicely with a bass line that complements them, giving the music a driving energy. This energy is something we’ve really worked at these last few months in our live performances, as this was the best thing about the gigs we went to – and separated the memorable bands from the alright ones. We found that the best way to tap into this energy was a blend of tight playing and wild moments that were unique to each performance.

We think a lot about texture when it comes to our sound, making sure that a song has the right mixture of loud and soft, full and empty passages. It was through this that we started to include drastic changes in texture to encourage a reaction from the listener/crowd, for example including sudden stops and switches from everybody in to just the vocals or even the drums. We’re expecting our sound to change and develop in the coming months, as our guitarist Josh has decided to leave and do his own thing in London, which will mean a different approach to our songs and maybe more stripped-back arrangements.

What are your main influences?
In terms of our sound we take a lot of inspiration from ’90s bands like Nirvana and Radiohead, and Britpop, along with the noughties indie bands we grew up on, like the Arctics, Kooks and Strokes. We reckon if you were to take Nirvana’s erratic sound and apply it to carefully written songs and a more Radiohead-like focus on guitar effects, then you’d be pretty spot on with the sort of songs we’re producing at the moment. In the grander scheme of things, we listen to A LOT of music. Other big influences are artists like The Beatles, The Velvet Underground, Bob Dylan (1964-66), Jeff Buckley, The Smiths and the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Tell us about the single, ‘Lately’ b/w ‘I’ve Been Thinking’
These two songs came about last autumn, soon after our second EP, Make Your Assumptions (‘Lately’ was actually written by Jamie on the evening of recording sessions). The two songs both show a progression from our older songs and, at least to our ears, show us finding more of our sound. Both songs came from a simple acoustic version, written by Jamie, and were developed by the band in rehearsals (‘I’ve Been Thinking’ sped up considerably and made the transition from a lonely ballad into a tortured rock song). The two songs both deal with the subject of a girl, although neither is about a relationship. ‘Lately’ is set post-breakup and describes the guilt in not giving a person enough attention, and instead “[lying there] alone and think[ing] about all the times [he] should have called [her]”. ‘I’ve Been Thinking’, on the other hand, paints a picture of obsession and directly addresses the subject of this obsession. It is a song that is meant to capture the experience of trying to get someone out your head, but all that happens is you remember snatches of things they’ve said or images of “lifts in [her] car”.

Both songs were chiselled away at in gigs from winter to summer and recorded and mixed in two days, at Parlour Studios on the outskirts of Kettering, with help from our great producer and engineer Neil. The songs were our last project with our guitarist Josh, and we couldn’t have asked for a better way to part ways! We hope you enjoy the tracks as much as we do.

What are your live shows like?
For the past year we have been gigging more and more, making the transition from playing rarely at home functions, to now playing at least two gigs a month. Taking inspiration from other bands we have seen on YouTube and live in person (e.g. the Chillis, Nirvana, Father John Misty, Catfish And The Bottlemen, and Dead Pretties), we have worked at our live performance, focusing on connection to the crowd and the energy generated from this. In the past year our favourite gig, and one that would be an example of us live, was one that we set up ourselves with two local bands (Street Asylum – Uppingham band and Naked Molerats – Kettering band). We invited 200 or so friends and in the end over 270 showed up, bought a ticket, and danced themselves crazy. We never drink before playing as we think it slows us down and stops us from accessing the moment, and we’ve found we don’t need to as, when a gig is going well, the adrenaline and electricity in the air pushes you to do and try things that you can’t conceive in a rehearsal, and it’s this spontaneity that drives our performance.

Are you part of a wider scene in Northamptonshire, playing with like-minded bands? Any favourite bands/venues to play with?
Recently we’ve really enjoyed playing with local bands from all over the county, in Kettering, Corby, Rushden, Northampton and the surrounding villages, with bands like The Scruff, Citrus, Oddity Island, Street Asylum and Sarpa Salpa. These bands have helped us get a feel for the local scene and we have really appreciated the leg up and advice they’ve given us. We’ve played in some cracking venues, our favourites being Kino Lounge [Kettering] and The Charles Bradlaugh [Northampton].

What has been your favourite band moment of the past year?
It has to be from the gig we organised ourselves at the Barton Seagrave Village Hall, with Street Asylum and Naked Molerats. The week leading up to the event, our drummer broke his thumb playing football and, after being casted up, realised that he couldn’t even hold a drum stick in his right hand, let alone play the kit. After considering all our options and mentally preparing ourselves for a last-minute cancellation, Nathan decided to play one handed. We were pretty shocked, and our first reaction was to laugh, but, on hearing his playing at the rehearsal the day before the gig, we realised he was still capable of carrying the set and, more to the point, still playing incredibly. So, although he was shattered by the end, and needed a hand setting up, Nathan played the 80 minute set with complete confidence and maintained the power needed to drive our sound.

What was the last album you bought/streamed?
An album we’ve all recently been listening to is Silver Revolver, by [Australian folkie] Angus Stone, under his alias Lady Of The Sunshine. It’s a great mixture of well-crafted ballads and raw ’70s-inspired blues rock.

You’re all relocating to Brighton, is that correct?
Basically Jamie, James and Nathan are moving to Brighton as of this week, and all studying different courses at the British and Irish Institute of Modern Music. Josh has decided to relocate to London instead and focus on his solo career, which we’re really hoping goes well. We’ll miss him a lot! The plan in Brighton is exactly what you’d think: play as often as possible, keep writing and recording new music, and hopefully build a fanbase and see where it goes.

What is your burning desire for the band to do in the future?
As a group we’re very ambitious. We will continue to set challenges for us to meet until we’re selling out gigs not only across the UK but hopefully the US. Bear with us on that one! If we had to pick one thing that as our ‘burning desire’, it would be to write and record a debut album that turns heads and joins the ranks of such great first albums as Oasis ‘Definitely Maybe’, the Arctic Monkeys Whatever People Say About I Am… and Jeff Buckley Grace (yes the name was definitely partially inspired by this!). If it means waiting a couple of years until we’re ready to drop it, the ‘perfect debut album’ is something that is definitely on our minds.

‘Lately’/’I’ve Been Thinking’ is available now via the usual steaming/download platforms

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New Music Friday: Drinsipa

Corby mathcore trio Drinsipa have just released a new single, ‘DOP’. Hear it below, along with an interview with singer/guitarist Beb Reed. How did you guys get together? Why the switch…

Corby mathcore trio Drinsipa have just released a new single, ‘DOP’. Hear it below, along with an interview with singer/guitarist Beb Reed.

How did you guys get together? Why the switch to a three-piece after so long as a duo?
Beb: Josh and I are cousins, and basically in 2013 he came down from up north to live here! And we didn’t really know any other musicians in the local area who wanted to do the same sort of stuff we wanted to do, and had no connection to the local music scene, but we enjoyed jamming and rehearsing, so we started a band with our mate Arran. We played a few gigs, and we were really in to it. We started to write some songs on our own aside from that band, and then we got a gig and had to think of a name, thus Drinsipa was born. We started getting a lot of gig offers quite soon which we’d never had before, and we haven’t really stopped since then. We just love playing gigs and being around the people involved in the music scene. We started writing some more complex and experimental songs mainly due to different influences from different bands we were listening to. Having recorded a full length album, we felt it was time to switch things up a bit. We recorded the Poppy Fields EP from home at our old flat in Poppy Fields in Kettering. We played some gigs with the new songs and we had a really good response, but felt we’d benefit from a bass player to fill some of the more chordy and harmonic parts of the songs from the EP. We had toyed with the idea of having our mate Myles come and play bass for us, so when we decided we were going to get a bass player, we instantly thought of Myles. We taught him the songs and he picked up on them really quickly. We started playing some more shows and writing some new stuff and here we are now.

How would you describe your sound?
We find it hard to describe our sound as we try to make the songs sound as non-traditional as possible. We play with a lot of time signatures and obscure song structures, mainly for a laugh and to keep it interesting not just to perform, but to play, or in some cases just to listen back to ourselves. I’d say dynamics are a big part of the sound, as we have a lot of different sounding sections in songs, so they can go from oober brutal to melodic clean within the space of 4 bars, or in our case every 1 and 3/4 bars [that’s a joke]. But if someone asks, I usually say mathcore because it’s the probably the biggest influence of ours.

What was the reaction like to your debut album 42, from 2016?
The reaction was fantastically amaze balls. The album launch show was especially good. We played at The Hut in Corby, and it went fuckin’ mental!!! We didn’t push the album as much as people thought we should have done, but in all honesty, we only do things as a band we think are fun, because we really don’t want it to turn in to a chore for us. We just appreciate that people loved what we were doing and bought our album. We still get comments about it today, and it’s really cool that people dig it. We were quite out of touch with social media back then too, but it’s a lot easier to do now we have an extra helping hand.

Tell us everything about the new single, ‘DOP’.
It’s titled after the practice studio in which it was written; shout out to the The Pod in Corby! It was the first song we wrote after the Poppy Fields EP. We were going for a more visceral, aggressive sound and with the added help of Myles we were able to work out some pretty interesting sounds. The track is full of fuzzy bass and crazy weird riffs and time sigs. It has a cool major-key riff that floats in and out of the track between the more aggressive section and really stupidly stupid heavy section at the end, which is always fun to play live.

Are you part of a wider scene in Northamptonshire, playing with like-minded bands? Any favourite bands/venues to play with?
We play with a lot of different kinds of bands in Northampton, too many to name all of them! We don’t let a difference in genre stop us from playing with bands so it’s just one big mates fest! Skirt, King Purple, Monarchs, Sarpa Salpa are just a few of our local favs!

What has been your favourite band moment of the past year?
We just recently played The Guildhall as part of Twinfest, that was crazy! Huuuuuge hall with huge sound, had a great time! We also flew over to Germany as part of Twinfest and played some gigs over in Marburg, which was phenomenal. Probably one of the highlights our musical lives let alone the past year! We made some great friends and connections over there and it’s cool to be part of the Twinfest family.

What is your burning desire for the band to do in the future? What plans do you have?
We don’t have too many burning desires for the band. We love playing gigs and hearing feedback about our intentionally confusing music. We know it’s not for everyone, which is part of the reason we write the music we do. I think writing and recording is a big part of why we do what we do, and we like to have a physical copy of music that we have written and recorded, there’s something quite special about that. I guess we will have to see what happens, but for now it’s just a barrel o’ laughs!

DOP is out now for ‘name your price’ here

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