Tag: northants

New Music Friday: Over The Influence

Northampton hard rock band Over The Influence today share their debut video to recent EP track ‘Can’t We Love’, filmed by Joshua Goff. Katie Montford marked the occasion for New…

Northampton hard rock band Over The Influence today share their debut video to recent EP track ‘Can’t We Love’, filmed by Joshua Goff. Katie Montford marked the occasion for New Boots by speaking to the band.

When and why did you form?
James: I went about looking to form the band in 2015; my last band split up from members moving away so I wanted to start a new venture.

What music inspired the band?
James: Too much to put into one list but to name a few: Guns n’ Roses, Motley Crue, Black Stone Cherry, Stone Temple Pilots, Halestorm, Led Zeppelin, Buckcherry, Monster Truck, The Dead Daisies, etc.

Growing up who did you listen to? Has your musical tastes changed?
James: The first band I ever really got into was The Rolling Stones. Their track ‘Brown Sugar’ is the song that turned me on to music, and then, when I discovered Guns n’ Roses my life changed, haha! Been listening to the same kind of bands ever since.

Do you remember your first band gig?
James: The first ever OTI show was held in my back garden – we decided to set the band up under a marquee and invite like 80-odd people over, BYOB. Safe to say we had a few angry people from the neighbourhood interrupt. If it’s too loud, you’re too old!

Who is on your playlist right now?
Bex – My choices change on a daily basis, but I’d say: Santa Cruz, Alter Bridge, Stone Sour, The Cruel Knives, Massive, and even some heavier bands like Feed the Rhino! To be honest as long as it’s got some killer riffs, a sweet groove and some awesome vocals it’ll usually find its way onto my playlist.
James: At the minute i’m playing a lot of Alice in Chains, Alter Bridge, The Dead Daisies, Lynch Mob, Skid Row and Ratt.

What inspired ‘Can’t We Love’?
Bex – ‘Can’t We Love’ is probably our most pissed-off song, because it’s all about being fed up with the way the world is ran and how it needs to change! There’s hints to the government and their decisions to prioritise money over human life, the media and the web of lies they spin around their viewers and audience and just the general lack of empathy we have for one another. We’d just hear about yet another terrorist attack from ISIS and were just so angry and ‘Can’t We Love?’ was born from that anger.

Do you change persona when you perform?
Bex: I wouldn’t say I change ‘persona’ per-say, but I would say that my general attitude and personality is just more exaggerated. There’s always got to be an element of performing, so I think you can’t ever truly be the person you are at work/home etc. But I also think it’s so important to be yourself on stage as that’s who your audience connects with and builds a relationship with.

Do you feel the band has changed with time?
Bex: Absolutely! I think as we’ve matured as musicians, so have our songs both musically and lyrically. If you listen to songs like ‘Take Control’, which is one of our older songs, you get that more classic rock and bluesy feel, whereas ‘Can’t We Love’ is far heavier and meatier and shows influences from modern rock and even some of the softer sides of metal, which is more in the direction of the next EP’s sound.
James: I agree with Bex, we’ve definitely naturally developed a heavier, more ‘modern’ edge to the sound which I think will shine properly on EP #2.

What was the musical process like? Did you have the idea of the whole song? Lyrical content, instrumentation?
Bex: If I’m honest we don’t really have a set ‘process’ for writing. For ‘Can’t We Love?’ James wrote the riffs and set the structure of the song. All that was left were the lyrics, and this was actually the first song I’d had any lyrically input on. The lyrics were written when me and James were sat in his dining room after hearing the news about the most recent ISIS attack and just needed to write this song.

Who writes the music/lyrics?
Bex: Generally speaking, James writes the main riffs, but each instrument takes ownership of their parts. We like to all sit in a room and bounce ideas off one another, as that tends to create the most ‘OTI sounding’ songs. Previously, James wrote all the lyrics too, but pushed me to take over that role from him once I joined the band on a permanent basis.

What made you make ‘Memories’ so different to the rest of your EP? Both vocally and musically.
Bex: This is actually quite a funny story. So I went to Reading festival with James and of course he found himself in a mosh pit at Five Finger Death Punch’s set, and he broke his finger! This meant he lost all real movement and strength in his bottom two fingers, so really struggled to play guitar for a good couple of months. Whilst he was in a cast he was playing around with an acoustic guitar and wrote the chorus for ‘Memories’. Me previously being an acoustic singer songwriter I fell in love with the song, and myself and James wrote the lyrics and finished the song together. We played it to a few of our friends and family and they loved it too, so we ended up gigging it at a few acoustic shows we played and it got such great feedback we knew it had to go on the EP. We love that it shows our softer side, and I love that I’ve been able to bring my ‘lighter’ vocals to the band, and we feel it just shows a different and more vulnerable side of us to our audience.
James: I’m a big fan of bands that can write both a killer, heavy rock song and also tame it to acoustic when needed. Alice in Chains are a great example of this. Like Becky said I’d broken my finger so the chorus was accidentally written, I went to play a power chord and realised i didn’t have enough fingers, this strange inverted sorta sound came out and i played with it for a bit and got ‘Memories’. In terms of the song itself: I’ve made a lot of stupid decisions in my life so I wrote the song about regret, Bex came in and helped write a lot of the lyrics too.

Did you always want perform rock?
Bex: Not at all! Previously I performed as a solo artist playing self-written acoustic pieces. Although rock music was always a huge passion of mine I never thought I had a ‘rock voice’. I never intended to join OTI but I was asked to fill in some shows on a last-minute basis as James knew I was a singer, and I’ve never looked back!
James: Always have and always will!

Do you have any upcoming shows?
Bex: We’re honoured to be supporting Stormbringer for the second time, playing at our local and legendary venue The Roadmender at the end of April. We love playing with those guys, they’re tight as hell and they’ve got some wicked tunes! In terms of other shows, we’ve got some exciting things booked including some festival slots, but at the moment we’re really focusing on getting some new material written in preparation for our newest EP.

What can we expect next?
Bex: We’re currently in the process of writing the next EP, which we’re hoping will continue to demonstrate that slightly more heavier side that we feel ‘Can’t We Love?’ has begun to show. Think fatter, riffier and more groovy beats that’ll get your head nodding and your heart racing. We might even throw in another acoustic number 😉
James: The majority of the 2nd EP is written and sounding massive now, so it’s just a case of writing the last couple of tracks and then recording it, mixing, mastering and the usual bullshit that goes with releasing an EP.

 

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Deaf Trap: interview and new video for ‘Real Nice Night’

Following the release of their second EP, Miscreants, Peter Dennis spoke at length to Northampton alt-rockers Deaf Trap. The band comprises of Matthew Wetherill (guitar), Rob Gray (drums) and, rather…

Following the release of their second EP, Miscreants, Peter Dennis spoke at length to Northampton alt-rockers Deaf Trap. The band comprises of Matthew Wetherill (guitar), Rob Gray (drums) and, rather confusingly, the band has two Tom Wrights: Thomas (vocals) and Tom (bass). The lads tell New Boots about their songs, their scene, and their plans for the future. Plus, the new video for Miscreants track ‘Real Nice Night’ is below.

How easy was it to find three other guys with similar musical tastes who you could tolerate?
Matthew Wetherill: For me it comes down to genuinely being really good friends. It’s probably a clichéd thing to say…
Thomas Wright: We basically met up as mates and then Matthew started playing guitar and we used to cover things where I’d sing along and then we used to write songs about the hotel that we worked for and how much we absolutely hated it! [laughs]
Matthew: That was it. It was almost like Billy Bragg protest songs about a posh conference centre. We’d go for a night out and because we didn’t have any money we’d go round someone’s house, drinking, playing guitar, singing…
Tom Wright: Many years later…here we are! [laughs]
Thomas: We’re late bloomers.
Tom: It took us a long time to get our first gig. We were practising for over two years.
Matthew: That’s one of the good things. It’s like a slow build. You’re not forcing anything.
Tom: You see all these young bands, we play with them and they’re awesome.
Thomas: It’s depressing, isn’t it? [laughs] That band who were on at The Lab [The Keepers], they were really good and The Barratts were saying how young they were and The Barratts are younger than us! The Barratts were getting annoyed at how young The Keepers were and I thought, ‘Shit! That’s exactly how I used to feel about you!’
Matthew: That’s it. We have a closeness. I say it all the time but you have to be comfortable falling out with people. And that way when you do fall out with people, although it’s not always nice, because you’re comfortable enough you just go past it, because you’re that good friends, you’re happy to tell each other what you think. It means you don’t hold things in so much, there’s no tension. It’s a much more natural progression because of it.
Thomas: There is the occasional strop in this band and it usually takes a couple of beers to get over. [laughs]
Rob Gray: That’s a Deaf Trap recommendation. A good conflict and resolution solution. Always resolve it.
Thomas: [laughs] No punching!

Can we talk about your musical influences? What do each of you bring to the Deaf Trap sound?
Rob: My pretentious answer to that is everything I’ve ever heard. I know the stuff I like but it doesn’t necessarily influence what I’m doing here. It’s whatever you hear at the time. Within this band the style I play there’s a lot of Chad from the Red Hot Chili Peppers, the way he whacks those drums. I can’t think of a nice way to say it but he slams those drums, he fucks them up, he really hits them. I’m influenced by hip hop and trip hop beats, it doesn’t play out in this band apart from some break parts. More recently Foals or Bloc Party, they’re both heavily tom-based, they don’t just do the straight beats, they’re almost dance beats with some rocky bits and then a lot of tom’s to make it sound tribal. The Trail of Dead do some awesome stuff and Ginger Baker is one of those guys with that swing.
Thomas: I suppose in terms of things I listen to, it’s traditional indie. I like a lot of Britpop, I like indie bands. These guys write some basic music first and I have to adapt and put my mark on it so… I kind of experiment with my voice and then it just comes out. I don’t draw on anything specific. I’m not a musician! I just keep trying until something good comes out. Sometimes it doesn’t!
Matthew: For me very, very early on it would have been The Cribs and The Libertines, that’s the age I was when I first picked up a guitar. I’d go to watch bands at The Soundhaus and always be a bit in awe and when I saw those bands and the carelessness with which they played but still generated more emotion out of me than any of the other bands did that made me think, maybe I could do that. As I got older I really listened to The Pixies and Sonic Youth. That’s where, if I need a bit of inspiration, it’s down that route. I wouldn’t write a whole song and come to practice and say ‘Right, how can you guys add to this?’ I might start off with something and then it will change so much from what it was with everybody’s input. It doesn’t come from one particular influence. By the time a song’s finished you can’t trace it back to anything because the ideas are so collected now.
Tom: This might come as a shock to the band but I listen to a lot of Nirvana, Foo Fighters. I listen to a lot of Rolling Stones, I like the bass in Royal Blood. I get a lot of my bass riffs and ideas from Royal Blood and stuff like that.
Rob: That drummer is sick, the Royal Blood drummer. I saw him live. Solid.

It sounds like you all have disparate influences. How do you bring them together and make them work cohesively?
Matthew: It tends to to be, I’ll have a guitar riff, Tom will have a bass riff and then we’ll loop and throw guitars and things over the top. In doing that and having a bit of a jam you can usually work out two or three different ways it could go because we don’t fall out as much now.
Thomas: Sometimes it does reach a point where, say, two of the band have got completely different ideas and at the end of a practice everyone’s a bit disjointed because it keeps going round because nobody can decide. Usually everyone goes home, has a sleep on it, comes back and says “Actually, that’s a good idea after all. We’ll try that”. There are certain points where there’s a bit of stubbornness .
Matthew: You have to draw a bit of a line, don’t you? But when you do come back to it and everyone thinks there’s two different ways we can do it, retry everything. That’s the thing these days, there’s no “We’re not doing that”. If one person thinks something and another the other, we’ll do two different ways. It’s very rare at the end of that we don’t agree.
Tom: We tend to go through at least ten ideas before we get to a song.
Rob: We do drop a lot because there’s too many things going on in there so we can’t agree so what’s the point in sticking with it if we can’t agree? We move on and we end up with the stuff we can agree on and when we have that one idea we can all agree on, that’s what makes it cohesive.
Thomas: I think that because everyone’s a bit different does slow down the process of writing a song, but it adds to the end product. We’re all usually happy with the way it sounds and at the beginning nobody thinks it’s going to sound like that, it’s always something completely different.
Matthew: Obviously when you listen back to some of our songs and you know the influences then as much as you wouldn’t say “That song sounds like Foals” or “That song sounds like Sonic Youth” if you really pick it apart and pay attention you can see where those ideas were spawned.

Your recent single ‘From the Floor’ is quite dark, and not what I expected.
Rob: I wasn’t aware that ‘whore’ was a swear word. It’s not in America.
Matthew: The interesting thing with that is, it’s worth putting on record, it’s a song about having struggles with alcohol, drugs, that sort of thing.
Rob: It’s a massive metaphor.
Thomas: Actually the core line in that came from Rob.
Rob: It was the first time we really started to sing together. That’s what really pushed it as a song. The original lyric was ‘Need somebody to love’ – it was too George Michael for us. So I sang ‘Please stop being a whore’ instead. It just sounded a bit rougher, a bit rock and about not going too far with things.
Thomas: We toyed with the idea of changing it to something that would be played on the radio, and then we thought ‘Fuck that!’; we’re not pandering to society. The thing is everybody’s offended all the time about whatever and to be offended is somebody’s choice and how they interpret our lyrics is how they interpret our lyrics. If they’re offended by that it’s because they’ve taken something from the lyric and it reflects on them rather than us.
Rob: It’s not necessarily talking about a woman. It could be talking about yourself, about a friend of yours. It’s just a general sense of going to far.
Thomas: When I sing it I think of it as a kind of battle. A first person singing to himself: “I’m going out tonight, I don’t want to do this, I’m always a whore when I go out”. That’s the avenue I take mentally when I’m on it. Obviously it’s a fictional character…I’ve never been a whore! [laughs]
Rob: We’ve got to make it clear that it’s not a re-imagining of The Police’s ‘Roxanne’. It’s not that. You don’t have to put on the red light. It’s not the same thing.
Thomas: No. We’ve got a lot of respect for whores and we’d never sing about them in a derogatory manner.
Rob: We’ve got respect for all ladies of the night!

While we’re on the subject of ‘From the Floor’ it’s accompanied by a great video. How involved were you in that?
Rob: We did it all. I tried to take the lead because I’ve got a little bit of video making experience, but it was all of us.
Thomas: Jack, the lead in the video, always comes to our gig dressed as a hot dog so we thought that because he’s been so committed to the band we’d give him a lead role in our first video.
Rob: He was really creative in that, he was full of energy, God bless him, he was up for anything and always available and we can’t thank him enough really.
Matthew: We all really like it. It came out really well considering we had no budget.
Rob: Zero budget. It was just an idea to do something like Peep Show. For me it’s a bit like a cheap version of The Prodigy’s ‘Smack My Bitch Up’ video. Someone goes out and gets wasted and we just tried to put an extra element to it…a hot dog!
Matthew: The point being, not being able to get over your addictions. You fall into it at the start and at the end you are trying to recover and you fall back again.

What do you think of the local music scene?
Thomas: It’s underrated. There’s loads of great bands around. It’s not just Northampton, it’s Kettering, Corby and all the surrounding towns. I think we’re overlooked towards this end of the country.
Tom: Northampton’s really strong musically.
Matthew: We’ve got so many good bands like Monarchs, Thomas mentioned The Barratts earlier. The Keepers are doing really well.
Thomas: And they’re all nice guys. We get along well with all the bands. There’s no egotistical band where they’re all wankers and they don’t talk to or want to have anything to do with the other bands. They’re all really decent, sound people who’ll have beers with everyone.
Matthew: That’s true. I can’t think of any band in the town who I don’t like. I mean there’s obviously styles that you don’t prefer but in terms of any band we’ve played with I can’t think of anyone who’s been iffy.

There’s some cracking small venues in the town but what we really need is a good, medium size venue that has bands on every night.
Thomas: Bring back The Soundhaus basically. That’s what we all feel like. I was devastated when it closed.
Matthew: The Lab, at the moment, is the best venue in town for bands being able to play. They’ve gone to a lot of trouble to get a great sound system set up, it’s really starting to take off and that’s why we’re here today. It’s Independent Venue Week but the only other real venue I would say is The Roadmender, but that seems to be club nights.
Rob: They’ve got the main hall and a side room. If you want to do a bigger gig in that type of venue then… The Picturedrome have had their entire room refitted. Our next video is due to come out, it’s done at The Lodge with Max, and he renovated The Picturedrome for it’s acoustics. I can’t wait to hear a band there. It’s a difficult place to play because it was originally a cinema, so I can’t wait to hear a band there because if he’s done a good job then that would be a major higher class venue rather than a pub.
Matthew: It was a travesty when The Soundhaus closed because that was 380 capacity and that was perfect because you used to get bands who were about to break playing there and they booked some great bands. The list of bands from The Arctic Monkeys to The Libertines and so on. They all played there and whoever booked them at the time had all the contacts and we’re crying out for someone who knows what they’re doing. The town’s missing that. The Lab’s great but it has a lower capacity.
Rob: The town is fine for that: The Garibaldi’s putting bands on, The Lamplighter putting bands on, you can get a couple of hundred people in there but they’re all squashed. They’re not venues that are originally designed for that.. The main venues are shutting down because of neighbours who’ve moved in and want quiet and venues are also struggling financially.
Thomas: I think that’s where a lot of local bands get their break by supporting touring bands and there’s no major bands passing through. That’s where you get most of your exposure. When our old band supported Space at The Picturedrome we had a whole new crowd to play to. It was a great opportunity and it got us loads of new fans but without the touring bands we never would have had that. That’s what it’s like pretty much all the time.
Rob: I think if you look at what some of the surrounding towns are doing like Corby, Bedford, Milton Keynes even, they’re always supportive of their bands. Some of those things are out there which we’re keen to play this year to open thing up for us. My friend Karl was saying it’s a shame Northampton’s got all these bands coming up but unfortunately the surrounding areas are doing more. I think in time it’ll come up. The Lab is doing a lot. I don’t think it’s dying, it’s on its way up but it’ll take time. For the time being it’s worth driving to play 20 miles out of town to play somewhere that’s got venues of a decent size.

How do gauge your music development between the your two EPs? Is one an extension of the other, or is it more a quantum leap?
Matthew: We talked about this not so long ago. The first EP felt more ‘demo-ish’ because we needed something to go “Right! We’ve got new music, we’re technically a new band, here’s what we’ve got for you to listen to”. It wasn’t rushed but it was a case of, you want to give people something to check out, to decide if they want to come and see you, there was an element of that, whereas with the second it’s a lot more precise in the way it was written. We could have done five songs again but, no; these three we’re really happy with.
Rob: At this time it’s also an economic thing as well, to get an album done in a top recording house it’s gonna cost you hundreds of pounds, that’s realistic. We’re lucky to get the bargains we have, working with the people we have. We can go in there with a short time frame and they do great jobs. I think now the reaction we’ve got from these EPs…in a way people are waiting for an album and I think that’s next on the cards.
Thomas: We probably won’t release any more EPs, will we? We’ve done physical copies for the two EPs. I think now, until we get to the album stage, we’ll release things as a digital single.
Matthew: we can go and record a song in two or three hours because we live-take it generally – then we sing the vocals over the top. We don’t do it bit by bit, we have it quite organic and because of that we can do it really quick. So if we wanted to get something out there it won’t cost us a fortune. It’s working out the best way to do it. We’ve got a good amount of material out there [with those eight songs]. I don’t feel we need to jump into something straight away.

That was going to be my final question. What are your future plans?
Rob: We haven’t really talked about it so we may disagree. I’d like to record more this year, stick everything on that because we’ve got enough EPs. Maybe double down on them and get a couple more singles out this year. Then we could work more on them, rather than doing them in a day, if we can have that luxury of doing them in a week or a month then we can concentrate on getting our best sound, then maybe next year look at getting a full album out.
Thomas: I think it’s important to stay on the radar releasing smaller amounts of stuff more often so people don’t forget about you.
Matthew: That’s a good theory. Whatever the end goal is, along the way making sure people don’t lose touch with you.
Rob: Like we said, go to other places and raise our fan base and this year we’re going to concentrate a lot more on festivals, to enjoy that element of it.

https://www.facebook.com/DeafTrap

 

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It’s A Shoe In: Northants gig guide Mar 14th – Mar 20th 2018

GREG COULSON Wednesday March 14th The Malt Shovel Tavern, Northampton Young Northampton bluesman, influenced by the greats like Ray Charles, Booker T, and Steve Winwood, is on his ‘What’s New?”…

GREG COULSON
Wednesday March 14th
The Malt Shovel Tavern, Northampton
Young Northampton bluesman, influenced by the greats like Ray Charles, Booker T, and Steve Winwood, is on his ‘What’s New?” tour and plays an intimate hometown show. Music begins at 8.45pm, free entry

KYSTHLA + ASCARIS + ASHEN CROWN
Thursday March 15th
The Roadmender, Northampton
Extreme metal headliners from Wellingborough who continue to make waves nationally, ably supported by Gloucestershire black metal and more brutal metal from the West Midlands. Doors 7.30pm, £7 tickets

SHARKTEETH GRINDER + DRINSIPA + LOOSE TOOTH + BLOOD-VISIONS + ACOLYTES
Thursday March 15th
The Garibaldi Hotel, Northampton
Will the basement of the Gari be left standing after these lot do their thing? A night of punk/hardcore/noise to raise the spirits, and almost certainly send you deaf. Doors 7pm, £1 donation requested

BEDLAM BREAKOUT FESTIVAL
Friday March 16th / Saturday 17th / Sunday 18th
The Roadmender, Northampton
Psychobilly festival returns to the Roadmender for a weekend packed full of international rockabilly, psychobilly, garage thrash, and punk rock. Tickets are £10 on the door for Friday [doors 7pm], and £30 on the door for each day Saturday and Sunday [doors 12.30pm both weekend days]

JIMI MACK + DAMON TANG + ALEX GARDNER + KING PURPLE
Friday March 16th
The White Hart, Corby
The last Harmonics Collective event before they take a break, with headline sets from the underground folk/blues/psych artists Mack and Tang. Eclectic joy guaranteed. Doors 8pm, £4 on the door

WHO SAVES THE HERO? + THE YOUNG & RESTLESS + WISHING WOLF
Friday March 16th
The Prince of Wales, Kettering
South Wales pop punk headliners, with Northampton emo rockers and Kettering alt-rockers in tow. Music from 8.30pm, free entry

ASHBORN + FUELED HATE + HAEMA + DIALEKT
Saturday March 17th
Devonshire Club, Northampton
Local metal headliners make their much anticipated Northampton debut, with similarly inclined Midlands supports. Doors 6.30pm, £5 on the door

THE ENID + VHS PIRATES + VIA DOLAROSA + ROBERT JOHN GODFREY
Saturday March 17th
The Black Prince, Northampton
The fresh Enid line-up bring back their tent antics to their neighbours The Black Prince garden, with an opening set from Enid founder RJG [who now works on solo compositions] and formidable local support. Doors 6pm, free entry

DON GALLARDO + LUNA ROSA
Saturday March 17th
The White Hart, Corby
The Nashville-based American singer-songwriter plays Americana/country/folk, in support of his new album Still Here. Local rockers Luna Rosa open proceedings. Doors 8pm, £8 tickets

GREASY DIABLOS + GARDEN
Saturday March 17th
The Hopmaster General, Rushden
Local punk/garage/blues headliners play the craft beer shop, with buzzy Northampton indie/alt-rock quartet in support. Doors 8pm, free entry

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It’s A Shoe In: Northants gig guide Mar 7th – Mar 13th 2018

HELGRIND + DONKERKARNUFFEL + FUELED HATE Friday March 9th The King Billy, Northampton The Billy has become a traditional tour starting point for London metal outfit Helgrind, who are joined…

HELGRIND + DONKERKARNUFFEL + FUELED HATE
Friday March 9th
The King Billy, Northampton
The Billy has become a traditional tour starting point for London metal outfit Helgrind, who are joined by fellow Londoners Donkerkarnuffel [“Clowncore”] and Corby metallers Fueled Hate for a night of mayhem, head banging, drinking and theatrics. Doors 7pm, free entry

THRIFT STREET + WE ARE GIANTS + 16 DEGREES + THE TOUCH
Friday March 9th
The Black Prince, Northampton
Battle of the Bands organised by students from the university, in aid of Oxfam. Doors 7.30pm, £3 on the door

THE VIBRATORS + THE BLUE CARPET BAND + WRECK-AGE
Saturday March 10th
The White Hart, Corby
First wave UK punk rock, going since 1976 and still touring and recording. Support from a powerhouse five-piece garage punk rock’n’rollers based in London, and punks Wreck-Age open proceedings [made up of members of Crettin 77, First Wave and B Movie Britz]. Doors 7.30pm, £7 tickets

THE ABRAHAMS + ODDITY ISLAND
Saturday March 10th
The Hopmaster General, Rushden

So it turns out there’s a craft beer shop in Rushden hosting gigs. Wow. Listen to Kettering progressive folk-rock skiffle, supported by similarly-inclined jangly rockers, whilst sipping on the General’s brewed delights. Doors 8pm, free entry

SUB CLOWNS + SOLARIZE
Saturday March 10th
The Horseshoe Inn, Wellingborough
Retro-Beat this month presents electro headliners and indie rockers in support. Doors 8pm, free entry

PROGNOSIS + REAPER + LEASHES + THOSE SNAKES
Saturday March 10th
The Lab, Northampton
The Mammothfest Heats keep on coming!  Progressive metal from Manchester, thrash metal from Liverpool, heavy sounds from London, and some psychedelic thrash metal from Stafford respectively. Doors 7pm, £5 on the door

Also a shout out to Sarpa Salpa, Drinsipa, and Keiron Farrow who will be representing Northampton at the Mano MusikFestival in Germany this weekend. Do us proud!

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New Music Friday: The Keepers

Northampton quartet The Keepers release their fourth single this weekend. The A-side ‘Take Me On A Trip’ is a moody paean to the joys of escapism, wrapped up in desert…

Northampton quartet The Keepers release their fourth single this weekend. The A-side ‘Take Me On A Trip’ is a moody paean to the joys of escapism, wrapped up in desert rock guitars. B-side ‘Leaving Home’ is more of a Britpop/Beatle-esque pop song with some nifty artificial string lines in the chorus. You can hear both below. New Boots caught up with Jordan Jones (vocals, guitar) and Liam Taylor (guitars) for a quick chat

How did you guys get together?
Jordan: I formed the band a couple of years ago. I just had a few songs that thought would sound cool with a full band behind them. It’s been a long process really trying out different members.

How would you describe your sound?
Jordan: 1960s psychedelia with a 90’s kiss.
Liam: Yeah. Indie Britpop with an add of Psychedelic

Who are your main influences in music?
Liam: Wilko Johnson, Paul Weller, and Pete Townsend

What was the last album you bought/streamed?
Jordan: ‘Wildlife’ by The Lovely Eggs
Liam: ‘The Masterplan’ by Oasis

What was the inspiration for ‘Take Me On A Trip’ and ‘Leaving Home’?
Jordan: ‘Take Me On A Trip’ is a recycled song we used to play a few years ago, we needed a more groovy and heavier sounding song, so I just took that, changed the words and added some extra riffs. ‘Leaving Home’ is inspired by The Beatles song ‘She’s Leaving Home’. We all know the original from a very upset mum and dad perspective. I had this concept of the song from the girls perspective – it sticks to main themes of the original like leaving the note, the man in the motor trade etc, but I’ve had to add a few bits like getting married and running away from university which I think makes it slightly more modern.

Being on stage vs being in the studio, which do you do prefer?
Jordan: studio
Liam: stage all the way; I love the atmosphere and the interaction with the crowd.

What has been your favourite band moments so far?
Jordan: Supporting The Moons at Roadmender, Space at The Picturedrome and playing Beano On The Sea festival down Hastings.
Liam: Supporting The Moons and The Spitfires

What plans do you have for 2018?
Jordan: We have some very exciting things coming up this year! We have more singles coming out and some fantastic gigs we cannot announce yet! Watch this space!

 

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It’s A Shoe In: Northants gig guide Feb 28th – Mar 6th 2018

PHIL BEER Thursday March 1st Castle Theatre, Wellingborough Multi-instrumentalist Phil Beer is something of a national treasure on the folk, roots and acoustic scene. One-half of award-winning powerhouse Show of…

PHIL BEER
Thursday March 1st
Castle Theatre, Wellingborough
Multi-instrumentalist Phil Beer is something of a national treasure on the folk, roots and acoustic scene. One-half of award-winning powerhouse Show of Hands, Beer is equally as in demand for his solo shows, like this one on his ‘String Theory’ tour. Doors 8pm, £15 tickets

THAT JOE PAYNE + BORROWING BEES
Friday March 2nd
The Picturedrome, Northampton
Award-winning Ex-Enid vocalist celebrates the launch of his debut solo single, hosting his first show in almost two years with full band. Doors 7.30pm, £15 tickets

LOOSE TOOTH + FUNERAL SHAKES + EX-PETS
Friday March 2nd
The White Hart, Corby
Hardcore and rock’n’roll sounds from Northampton and St. Albans. Lots of bang for your bucks here. Doors 8pm, £2 tickets

GARDEN + MONARCHS + KING PURPLE
Friday March 2nd
Club 43, Northampton
The Barratts launch their own clubnight, ‘Green Carnation’, with three of ShoeCounty’s finest indie rock’n’roll troupes. Barratts boys DJing afterwards too. Doors 9pm, free entry

WILLIE & THE BANDITS
Friday March 2nd
The Roadmender, Northampton
Cornish classic blues rock three-piece much in the vein of Cream or The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Doors 7.30pm, £12 tickets

LEASHES + STEREO SKULL + LIVING IN ECHOES + HAEMA
Friday March 2nd
The Lab, Northampton
More alternative sounds in the Mammothfest Best Band heats competition, all hailing from London, Northants, and the south-coast. Doors 7pm, £3 tickets

THE MOBBS + HUBCAP + THE KEEPERS
Saturday March 3rd
The Lamplighter, Northampton
Say it ain’t so! One of the best bands to ever come out of ShoeTown are calling it a day. The Mobbs sign off their primitive garage rock’n’roll days with one last, presumably ferocious, show. Excellent support acts too make this unmissable. Doors 8pm, free entry

LITTLE BITBOY
Saturday March 3rd
The Garibaldi Hotel, Northampton
8-bit Chiptune dance music, played live on a NES console and synths! Mr Skank on the decks before and after too. Doors 8pm, free entry

No Comments on It’s A Shoe In: Northants gig guide Feb 28th – Mar 6th 2018

Marmozets plug second album with Roadmender show

Alt-rockers Marmozets have announced a number of spring UK shows, including the Roadmender in Northampton. The band will play the 850 capacity venue on Wednesday May 9th. The quintet from West…

Alt-rockers Marmozets have announced a number of spring UK shows, including the Roadmender in Northampton.

The band will play the 850 capacity venue on Wednesday May 9th. The quintet from West Yorkshire released their sophomore album Knowing What You Know Now last month via Roadrunner Records, itself the follow-up to 2014 debut The Weird and Wonderful Marmozets.

Championed by the likes of Zane Lowe and having bagged prestigious support slots to Muse, the band was nominated in the Best British Newcomer category of the 2013 Kerrang! Awards and were voted Best New UK Band by Big Cheese magazine the same year.

Presale tickets go on sale at 9am today, with general sale beginning Friday March 2nd, also at 9am

Visit www.marmozets.co.uk for the full lowdown.

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It’s A Shoe In: Northants gig guide Feb 21st – Feb 27th 2018

A small but nonetheless pleasant collection of shows, featuring creamy ShoeCounty talent – and almost all of which are free entry. SARPA SALPA + GRACE + ODDITY ISLAND + MOTH…

A small but nonetheless pleasant collection of shows, featuring creamy ShoeCounty talent – and almost all of which are free entry.

SARPA SALPA + GRACE + ODDITY ISLAND + MOTH WING
Friday February 23rd
The Yards, Kettering
An indie feast in Kettering with a quartet of terrific young acts, all doing their own thing but still complementing each other. This might get messy [in the best possibly way]. Doors 9pm, free entry

VHS PIRATES + PRIMAL  + JONO & THE UKE DEALERS + TYPE 22
Friday February 23rd
The Lab, Northampton
The last Pirates gig for a while we understand. Plus the ever entertaining Uke Dealers, Royal Blood-style primal rock from Derby, and local young indie punks to open proceedings. Doors 7pm, free entry

THE KEEPERS + DEEP SEA MOUNTAINS
Saturday February 24th
The Pomfret Arms, Northampton
Hard-working indie mod rockers The Keepers and their ‘Take Me A Trip’ single launch, with a more whimsical/atmospheric support from DSM. Please note venue change. Doors 8pm, free entry

CATALYST + THOSE SNAKES + OPENSIGHT + WINTER’S EDGE
Saturday February 24th
The Lab, Northampton
The third Mammothfest Best Band heat at the Lab; this one featuring various shades of metal and prog from Milton Keynes, Stafford, London and Chichester. Doors 7pm, £3 tickets

LUNA ROSA + THE BOPHINS
Saturday February 24th
The Horsehoe Inn, Wellingborough
Retro Beat presents indie rock from Corby – Luna Rosa – with support from punk/alt-rockers The Bophins. Doors 8pm, free entry

 

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New Music Friday: Harry Pane

Brackley-born Harry Pane releases his new – and perhaps best – single today. ‘Beautiful Life’ is a meditative folk-ballad that can’t fail to produce an emotional shiver or two. Over…

Brackley-born Harry Pane releases his new – and perhaps best – single today. ‘Beautiful Life’ is a meditative folk-ballad that can’t fail to produce an emotional shiver or two. Over the past three years Pane has wowed the wider world with his raw skills of voice and guitar.  New Boots spoke to Pane about life in 2018.

Tell us a little about your journey from a boy in Brackley to the person now in Walthamstow, north London.
I was playing ‘the circuit’ in that area for a while just earning some pennies & it came to a point where I realised I needed to spread my wings a little.

Who encouraged you to begin making music?
I was influenced growing up on a farm watching my Dad jamming with friends as well as going to watch live music from a young age and it was a heavy influence on me.

Was there a eureka moment, an influence that pulled you in this direction?
When I first performed live at school aged 15, in front of a small assembly, it gave me buzz and I carried on doing it.

Did the move to London come from you or were you encouraged to relocate?
I had some friends down there so it made it easy to make the move.

Who are your main influences in music? The Celtic bits presumably come from John Martyn and some Richard Thompson.
That’s dead right, I love those two artists and their style of songwriting.  It goes across the board; from Damien Rice and Glen Hansard and Christy Moore to the likes of Bob Dylan, Tracy Chapman & Justin Vernon.

How do the words come to you; in fragments, a story to be told..?
Sometimes it can happen all at once and other times I have instrumental parts and no lyrics and vice versa.  I guess it’s just the artistic process.

An obvious question: what’s ‘Beautiful Life’ about?
I wrote it about the support I had around me through a difficult time, and that support helping you to make peace with it all.

We’re constantly told these days acts don’t even need a traditional label. In light of that could you tell us what Island are doing for you and your development?
Island gave me a development fund which I used for The Wild Winds EP, but now I’m an independent artist with AWAL, who I really love working with and I’m enjoying the adventure.

What is an “Official Showcasing Artist” at SXSW? Are you looking forward to the trip?
It’s the term that they use for the artists invited to play on the line up, there are hundreds of unofficial showcases going on around it which are also lots of fun, and I’m doing those too.  I played there in 2016, so it’ll be nice to be back having made more progress and learning a bit more. Austin is a great city.

What’s your favourite sort of show: intimate jazz house, pub with a fire, big festival crowd…?
I enjoy playing in all scenarios for different reasons, it’s nice to do a mix.

Do you always play solo, or do you ever have cohorts?
At the moment I have a double bassist in tow. I’m also looking out for other members as a side project.

What’s been the highlight of your music career so far?
I would say there’s been a bundle of positives that have made a difference to my career and given me the boost that I needed: successful crowdfunding, good relationships within the industry, great festival spots and more recently a publishing deal.

What is your burning desire for the future? What plans do you have?
To keep writing and co-writing and keep strengthening my material. The general goal is to grow a loyal and steady fan base whilst staying true to my love for the music.

Beautiful Life is out now to download/stream

 

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It’s A Shoe In: Northants gig guide Feb 14th – Feb 20th 2018

Something for everyone: trip hop, folk, metal, indie, rap-rock, psych, punk. Take your pick! BURROWING BEES + AOIFE FOLEY Thursday February 15th The Lamplighter, Northampton Post-Valentines love-in with intimate trip…

Something for everyone: trip hop, folk, metal, indie, rap-rock, psych, punk. Take your pick!

BURROWING BEES + AOIFE FOLEY
Thursday February 15th
The Lamplighter, Northampton
Post-Valentines love-in with intimate trip hop/electronica. Acoustic singer-songwriter support. Doors 8pm, free entry

WARS + FROM EDEN TO EXILE + STEREO SKULL + SIDERIAN + GARSHKOTT
Friday February 16th
The Roadmender, Northampton
Rugby-based post-hardcore quintet headline, with various shades of metal support [both local and national]. Phil Walker’s last Northampton gig, so show some support! Doors 7pm, £5 tickets

DEATH TRAP + THE WAX LYRICAL SOUND + BLUE TONGUES
Friday February 16th
The Black Prince, Northampton
A trio of bangers: alt-rock kings, rap-rockers, and Brummie garage rockers. The first 50 people through the door get a free shot of Fireball Whisky. Doors 8pm, free entry

FLEISCH + REAPER + WITCH TRIPPER + VIA DOLOROSA
Friday February 16th
The Lab, Northampton
Heat two of the Mammothfest Best Band 2018 competition, with entrants from Liverpool, Nottingham, and ShoeTown itself bringing the noise. Doors 7pm, £3 tickets

SAINT AGNES + MONARCHS + DRINSIPA
Saturday February 17th
The White Hart, Corby
Stomping riffy psych rock from London headliners (and future stars in the making we reckon), with prime Northants talent bringing up the rear. Doors 8pm, £3 tickets

CANDIDATES + SKIRT + THE RELIGHTS
Saturday February 17th
The Lab, Northampton
Indie and Britpop flavours at The Lab this evening: Milton Keynes newcomers Candidates headline, ably supported by Corby indie punkers and Bedfordshire rock’n’rollers. Doors 8pm, free entry

PALM READER + CANVAS + SHARKTEETH GRINDER + DEAD KIWIS + DRINSIPA
Sunday February 18th
The Black Prince, Northampton
Rising Nottingham hardcore band headline, with the appropriate Midlands support bases covered. One to make the effort for on a Sunday, without doubt. Doors 7pm, £6 tickets

THE YOUNG & RESTLESS + RECKLESS INTENTIONS + BETWEEN THE LINES + SAFEST SPACES
Sunday February 18th
The Lab, Northampton
Northampton emo/pop-punk outfit The Young & Restless play a hometown show to end their short tour with Reckless intentions. They play with similarly inclined MK and Bedford-based acts. Doors 7pm, £5 tickets

No Comments on It’s A Shoe In: Northants gig guide Feb 14th – Feb 20th 2018

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